Observations on Customer Experience Improvement

Good Better Best Keys Represent Ratings And Improvement

Just came across a very interesting article courtesy of McKinsey Quarterly‘s Classics mailing, discussing the need to optimize service delivered to customers needs. While it focuses on consumer businesses there are a few key learnings for enterprise technology support operations, demonstrated by this quote:

“Finding these savings requires rigor in customer experience analytics: […]. It also requires a willingness to question long-held internal beliefs reinforced through repetition by upper management. The executive in charge of the customer experience needs to have the courage to raise these questions, along with the instinct to look for ways to self-fund customer experience improvements.”

The McKinsey article identifies two main drivers of resistance to implementing effective improvements:

  • Organizational momentum and deep held, but often misplaced, beliefs. Frequently these beliefs are shared across management levels, causing the company to operate with ineffective goals that remain unchallenged
  • Lack of both rigorous analysis as well as the ability to present those results convincingly and effectively

A future post will discuss analytics techniques. Here I’d like to focus on a few causes preventing organizations from progressing towards effective and efficient improvements and combine a few of the blog’s previous posts for the benefit of new readers. First, we previously had a high level discussion of several differences between consumer and enterprise support, namely the different roles we interact with and the many more opportunities for friction.

We also wrote about complexity and volume. This is a very useful distinction, touching on the operational differences between high volume/low complexity operations and those with low volume/high complexity, as most enterprise support operations are.

Having said that, we frequently find concepts and metrics from consumer businesses that are not beneficial for the unique challenges of supporting enterprise technology. It becomes our job to educate the organization and provide deep, actionable insights to help the company excel efficiently. We’ll cover that in future posts

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