Sometimes The Extra Mile Is Free

Restaurant scene

Recently I visited a coffee shop while waiting to meet a friend. Walking in, I was impressed – the place was large, well lit and tastefully decorated. The food and pastries in the display cases seemed attractive, with quality ingredients and professional preparation. Clearly, those who designed and built this business aimed high, and their prices reflected that. As a long time observer of service operations I started wondering – could they deliver on the promise of the decor and the food?

Considering I only had tea, I couldn’t tell anything about the food except that other diners seemed to be enjoying it. However, from the service perspective I left with a few nagging points that directly apply to other service organizations:

  • The food is served in nice porcelain dishes which the crew clears once the customer has left. But, they do not wipe the tables, consequently, each table had some crumbs. Very few, but noticeable. When clearing the tables they do not use a tray, so we got a chance to see one of the crew walking slowly with a pile of dishes on her arms, trying not to drop them. Solution – get a tray, and put a little wet towel on it. Clear the dishes into the tray, wipe the table and be done.
  • When ordering a drink they take your order at the counter and bring the drink to the table. But, the crew has no clue how to walk straight while holding a cup. It was very comical watching one of them holding a saucer with both hands and walking slowly trying not to spill the coffee. Solution – rehearse, work on your muscle memory.

In both these cases, not only did the operation look unprofessional, but the employees were visibly embarrassed.

  • Last – my tea was delivered to the table in a cup. There was nowhere to dispose of the teabag nor were there sugar or stirrer on the table. I had to get up and get them myself, negating the point of table service. Solution? You guessed it. Bring a saucer, and place a few bags of sweetener on each table.

Now, there is a common thread between all these points. Fixing them will cost the business absolutely nothing, but requires an observant manager with a burning desire to keep improving the service. This begs the question, how much improvement could each of us make to our support operations at zero cost while helping our employees increase their skill and professionalism? How much better can we make them? What if we took the time to observe our organization from the side, and inspect every move and every action as they are perceived by the customer? Sadly, in many situations this seems to be everybody’s last priority.

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