Monthly Archives: September 2015

How to not respond to customers

Reply target

Recently I had the need to contact a company for support concerning a feature they removed from one of their product which I, and many other users, sound extremely valuable. Despite it being a free service, the support team responded on a weekend in time that would put most enterprise vendors to shame. However, the content of their message left a lot to be desired:

Thank you for contacting us!

Personally, I’m glad you brought this out. At […], we are constantly working to improve our platform and products. Suggestions from […] like you are an incredibly important part of that process. Updates can be done without notice, we will keep you informed if we make an update on our platform. We want you to know how much we appreciate your input and support!

Parsing this message, we find a number of items for improvement:

  • They start by saying “Personally, I’m glad” – but this is not a personal matter, I am interested in the company’s position, not the agent’s personal opinion
  • Then “At […], we are constantly working to improve our platform and products” – in this case they made a change that has negative impact on the customer experience, in the opinion of a large number users
  • Then “Suggestions from […] like you are an incredibly important part of that process.” – First, this is a general statement that has no bearing on anything, and second, I did not make a “suggestion”, I pointed out a change that’s making it harder for me to use the product
  • Followed by “Updates can be done without notice, we will keep you informed if we make an update on our platform.” – which is a plain contradiction
  • And the concluding sentence is “We want you to know how much we appreciate your input and support!” after doing everything to show that they don’t

This vendor, with a single response, managed to transform an otherwise satisfied customer with a product problem into a skeptical customer, questioning their commitment and willingness to provide service. Analyzing how this happened leads us to several conclusions:

  • Being too familiar and personal, with phrases like “personally” and “I’m glad”
  • Using phrases that sound good but have very little to do with the situation
  • Using feel good language as a substitute to meaningful information

Do your response templates suffer from similar problems or are you making it every individual person’s responsibility to produce their own customer responses? Have you ever read those responses with a critical eye? Or, even better, ask someone else to do that? If you service customers in multiple countries and cultures, are you aware of the differences in perception between those and your native culture?

Update: while writing this post I received a message from the vendor:

I’ve passed your message to our engineering team and will be better able to help with your particular question. You will receive a more detailed reply shortly; we appreciate your patience!

Which sounded like good news, until the following message arrived a day or two later:

Hi there,

We’re experiencing an extremely high volume of support requests currently and may not be able to directly answer every question received. Please browse our […] Help Center […] for articles that may help you resolve your issue, as it provides a lot of solutions to common issues reported by our learners.

If you have been able to answer your question in the last few days, there’s no need to reply to this message. If you have not been able to find your answer and still need assistance from us, please reply to this email and we’ll get an answer to you as soon as we can.

Thank you for your understanding as we continue to improve our support resources to help […] like you!
[…] Community Operations

Many companies have challenges handling growth, this one seems to do a particularly bad job at acknowledging it and taking the actions required.

I’ll post further updates when, and if, they are received